Impacted by Coronavirus? We Are Here to Help.

Updated November 12, 2021

Your home is your most significant asset—and because we get that, we’re here working to help you look after it. There’s nothing more important to us than helping you protect your home. One of the ways we can do that is by getting you the information, resources, and options you need. If you need to secure a forbearance plan because you’re experiencing a financial hardship due to the coronavirus or because your financial hardship due to the coronavirus is coming to an end, we’ll guide you through every step of the process.

To make it as easy as we can, this website should address your questions and concerns about how mortgage assistance works from forbearance to repayment or modification options. And you can get started right here, right now, whether you are requesting help for the first time, need to extend your forbearance, or be evaluated for other mortgage assistance options. You can also review our Frequently Asked Questions and visit the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) where you’ll find videos and other helpful information on topics about managing your finances during this challenging time.

Who owns your loan and why it matters
To understand the options available for getting help with your mortgage, it’s important to know who owns your loan. That’s because homeowners with loans owned or backed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, Federal Home Loan Bank, VA, USDA, and HUD, which includes FHA loans, (“federally backed loans”) are eligible for specific assistance options under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, while homeowners with loans owned by other institutions are eligible for other assistance options.

Most homeowners have federally backed loans but either way, we can let you know what your options are once you complete the form for mortgage assistance below. If you’d like to check for yourself, there are some online tools you can use to look up who owns your mortgage. For example, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac both offer a mortgage lookup tool on their websites. If you are currently experiencing financial hardship, forbearance is the first step for most.

A forbearance is a temporary suspension of all or part of your monthly mortgage payment. It gives you the time and flexibility you need to manage your finances until you’re able to resume your monthly mortgage payments. Forbearance does not mean your payments are forgiven. You are still required to fully repay your suspended payments, but you won’t have to do so all at once.

Deadlines for an initial forbearance for FHA, VA and USDA mortgages have been extended until the end of the National Emergency.

Mortgages backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac do not currently have a deadline for requesting an initial forbearance.

At this time, the declared National Emergency concerning the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic remains in place through at least the remainder of 2021, pending any further extensions.

What is Forbearance under the CARES Act?
The CARES Act allows you to request a forbearance on your federally backed loan regardless of your delinquency status. During forbearance, monthly payments (principal, interest, and escrow) are suspended for an initial period of up to 180 days or the equivalent of up to six months of monthly payments.

If you are still financially impacted by the coronavirus, your initial forbearance period may be extended for up to another 180 days for a total of 360 days or the equivalent of twelve monthly payments

There will be no additional fees, penalties or additional interest (beyond scheduled amounts) added to your account, if your hardship continues. You won’t need to provide any documentation to lengthen your forbearance period.

Note: If you pay your own property taxes, insurance, or HOA/condo fees separately from your mortgage, you may need to continue making these payments during forbearance.

In addition, many owners of federally backed loans and states have suspended foreclosure actions.

The maximum duration of forebearance for federally backed loans varies.

Whether you have an FHA, VA, USDA, FNMA or FHLMC backed mortgage, you
may shorten the forbearance period at any time should your situation change.

Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac (FNMA/FHLMC) backed mortgages

If you are still financially impacted by the coronavirus, your initial 180-day forbearance period may be extended for up to another 180 days for a total of 360 days or the equivalent of twelve monthly payments.

If you have a FNMA or FHLMC backed mortgage, you may be eligible for an additional 3-month extension as well as another extension of up to 3 months, as long as you do not exceed 18 months total delinquency or cumulative term.

You must have received your initial forbearance on or before February 28, 2021 to qualify for an extension beyond the twelfth month of forbearance.

VA backed mortgages

If you are still financially impacted by the coronavirus, your initial 180 day forbearance period may be extended for up to another 180 days for a total of 360 days or the equivalent of twelve monthly payments.

If you were in a VA COVID-19 forbearance on or before June 30, 2020, you may be eligible for an additional 3-month extension as well as another extension of up to 3 months. Neither of the two additional 3 month extensions may extend beyond December 31, 2021.

If you have not received a COVID-related forbearance as of September 29, 2021, you may receive a COVID- related forbearance if your request for the forbearance is made during the COVID-19 National Emergency.

USDA backed mortgages

For USDA backed mortgages, an initial payment forbearance will be approved upon request until the end of the National Emergency. The maximum duration of your forbearance period depends on the effective date of your initial forbearance period.

Effective Date of Initial Forbearance

Length of Initial Forbearance Period

Length of Additional Forbearance Periods

Length of Additional Forbearance Extensions

Maximum Forbearance Period

March 1, 2020 – June 30, 2020

Up to 6 months (180 days)

Up to 6 months (180 days)

Up to 6 months (180 days), in 3 month increments

Up to 18 months

July 1, 2020 – September 30, 2020

Up to 6 months (180 days)

Up to 6 months (180 days)

Up to 3 months

Up to 15 months

October 1, 2020 – Expiration of National Emergency

Up to 6 months (180 days)

Up to 6 months (180 days)

None

Up to 12 months

FHA backed mortgages

For FHA backed mortgages, the maximum duration of your forbearance period depends on the effective date of your initial forbearance period.

Effective Date of Initial Forbearance

Length of Initial Forbearance Period

Length of Additional Forbearance Periods

Length of Additional Forbearance Extensions

Maximum Forbearance Period

March 1, 2020 – June 30, 2020

Up to 6 months (180 days)

Up to 6 months (180 days)

Up to 6 months (180 days), in 3 month increments

Up to 18 months

July 1, 2020 – September 30, 2020

Up to 6 months (180 days)

Up to 6 months (180 days)

Up to 3 months

Up to 15 months

October 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021

Up to 6 months (180 days)

Up to 6 months (180 days)

0

Up to 12 months

July 1, 2021 – September 30, 2021

Up to 6 months (180 days)

Up to 6 months (180 days)

0

Up to 12 months

October 1, 2021 – the end of the COVID-19 National Emergency

Up to 6 months

Up to 6 months (if the initial forebearance will be exhausted and expires during the COVID-19 National Emergency)

0

Up to 12 months (if the borrower is eligible for the additional COVID-19 forebearance period)

Options for loans not backed by the federal government
For loans that are not federally backed, meaning they may be owned by another financial institution, such as a bank or credit union, there may be a number of options available should you be experiencing a financial hardship due to the coronavirus. Those options may depend on both your financial institution as well as state guidelines.

Whether you need to request an initial forbearance or extend your existing forbearance, complete the form on our website. It’s the fastest way to get started and stay on track.

What happens after I complete the form for an initial forbearance or an extension?

Within 7 to 10 business days of completing and submitting the form, you will receive a letter from us with all the details. We will also send you an email if we have your email address on file. We will then reach out during the final 30 days of the forbearance period to determine the next steps for your individual situation. If we are unable to reach you by phone and must leave a voicemail message, please call us back so that we may help you.

If your financial hardship has ended
Once your financial hardship has ended, we will work with you to determine the available options based on your financial situation, state of r esidence, and the type of loan you have. Your options may include*:

*Available options may vary depending on the type of loan you have and/or guidelines of your financial institution. Additional eligibility requirements and documentation may be required. The CFPB website offers additional information.

Whether your forbearance periods have been exhausted or your financial hardship is coming to an end and you’re ready to cancel your forbearance, complete the form on our website. It’s the fastest way to get the process started.

What happens after I complete the form because my forbearance periods have been exhausted or my financial hardship is coming to an end?

If your forbearance periods have ended or your financial hardship has ended but you are unable to resume normal payments, we’ll be able to evaluate you for available mortgage assistance options after you’ve completed the form. As part of the evaluation, we may ask you to share documents needed to help us determine your eligibility for the options available to you. Your type of loan, the state in which you live and your financial situation will help determine available options.

Please Note: Please be aware of scammers who often try to take advantage of consumers when they are most vulnerable. To learn more about scammers and how to avoid being taken advantage of, please visit the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s website